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English 51
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
and brash mayor, and the people of new york city loved him. we'll tell you about that, straight ahead. christine. >>> and the first jobs report of 2013 released in an hour and a half. the numbers for you, what it means for the health of the economy and the jobs market. >> and the defense secretary nominee on the defensive. chuck hagel grilled on capitol hill. did he blow his shot to convince lawmakers that he's the right man for the job? >> friday, february 1st, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. breaking news, we start with. two people have died, several people wounded in explosion that has taken place outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey. chris lawrence joins us from the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. not much information right now. turkey authorities are responding to that scene, trying to collect more information. the blast happened just a short while ago, some. news reports out of that area, saw a big flash, heard a big bang. reports of several people wounded near a side gate of the embassy. we're waiting for more information, the
city mayor ed koch has died. he passed away from congestive heart failure. he had really problems with his health over the last many years. mayor koch elected in 1977. he was a judge on the people's court, and he had been hospitalized recent well fluid on his lungs. moved to intensive care yesterday. he was 88 years old. richard socaridies joins us. writer for "new yorker," former aide to president clinton. when i was a kid growing up in long island, mayor koch was almost a mythical figure. >> larger than life. when i grew up in manhattan, he was mayor, and as you said, he was very feisty, said what he thought. new yorkers loved him. he gave new york some tough love. he would say whatever he thought, famous for savering a city from bankruptcy. but also governing at very challenging times, beginning of the aids crisis. a locality of racial tension and diversity. issues of racial tension and diversity in new york. he served during very challenging times, took very controversial positions, no one questioned he loved the city and a fighter for new york always. >> his personality itsel
is increasing its aerial bombardment of syrian cities and that is what refugees have told us. it is also an indication that the displaced syrians inside the country, there is no where safety "except the closest borders and they're having to flee forcibly because they cannot stay inside syria. this is putting all lot of strain on jordan. jordan is suffering from its own economic crisis and is unable to shoulder this responsibility alone. they have repeatedly called on the international community to raise aid to the refugee community. there were riots in inside the police. refugee camp in jordan. while refugees were queuing to receive assistance from a norwegian charity agency, scuffles broke out and we heard security forces had to use tear grasses -- had to use tear gas to disperse the protesters. some of the refugees attacked some of the aid workers and security forces. there is a very high level of frustration inside the camps because these people are having to live inside a cold community of tents outside the villa of the winter. these riots at scuffles are not unusual at have happened
the ancient city of timbuktu from militants, french forces in action again in the northern part of country. nbc's reporter is on the ground in timbuktu tonight. >> reporter: french fighter jets pounded arms depots and jihadist training camps, another major operation in this three-week long assault against al qaeda militants in the north of mali. 30 aircraft were involved in this operation to the north of key town. last time four somalians and french force. meanwhile, here in the legendary city of timbuktu, west african troops have been pouring in during the day to help to secure the outskirts of the city. meanwhile, the french troops have been moving out further into the desert. some were cheered as they went. at the end of this, the first week of freedom for the people of timbuktu for many, many months. lester? >>> new details emerging tonight in the story of sarai sierra, a mother of two found murdered in istanbul, turkey this weekend. >> reporter: one day after the body of sarai sierra was found in istanbul's old city, the police chief confirmed the american tourist was murdered. the ev
of the city? >> reporter: bill, that's the thing. it is unusual to see this sort of thing to happen in the beating heart of the turkish capital which is so very secured. there are a lot of police officers around. embassy is very close to the turkish parliament. it is not what you would expect here. we don't know that there were any threats but we do know that turkey is on of the edge these days with the conflict in syria, right on its border and some other things going on. but we did not hear, bill, of any sort of a threat. back to you. bill: amy kellogg. work your source. we'll be back in touch with london. here is martha with more. martha. martha: there is no word yet exactly who is behind this attack. there too soon to know who is behind this attack at this point. the worker's party known as pkk in october of 2011, the pkk killed 26 security forces. that was the deadliest attack since 1993. the u.s. provided turkey with over $5 million since 2010 for anti-terrorism and related programs to that. bill: the region, the amy referred to a little bit of this. there are so many hot spot
three cities. an egyptian man who appears in a video being beaten by police has security forces -- says security forces made him change his story. he is shown being stripped and bundled into of them in cairo. on sunday he appeared on egyptian television saying protesters attacked him, but now he says it is the police. more from cairo. >> this story has gripped the country for the past two days, and much of it was happening live on television. it was friday when this man who was beaten up and humiliated, drive naked under the eyes of the egyptians or saturday when he appeared again saying this was the protesters who had beaten him up or again today when he appeared saying it was the police who beat him up. it caused a huge embarrassment for the government. they are saying, here is approved in the pudding. this is why we will keep the pressure from the streets. the government has been very quiet. we only heard from the interior ministry spokesman who did say he did apologize. he did take responsibility, and we did say there would be an investigation carried out. >> the least 15 people are
the heart of the city near the soul of his reign. the largest detonated outside the headquarters of assad's ruling political party papt least 53 were found dead, mangled bodies amid blazing wreckage. the other two bombs exploded outside offices of assad's feared intelligence agency, killing another 22. rebels also claimed today that their mortar rounds hit the army's central command building. damascus, the capital, was the last city to mostly hold the vicious war at bay. the rebellion began nearly two years ago, a popular uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of the assad family. neighborhoods have turned to rubble. 70,000 people are dead, and refugees are pouring over the borders. some of the leaders of the opposition groups fighting in syria are not in syria tonight. they're in cairo for talks, and that's where we find our correspondent clarissa ward tonight. clarissa, what are they saying about the bombing, and what is the point of the talks there? >> reporter: well, scott, unsurprisingly, the opposition has released a statement condemning today's bombing and saying that the assad
-- mattresses, cooking stove, clothing. the 17-member family is from the region around the city a lot of -- teh city a -- the city aleppo. the farmer and his children fled three weeks ago from the advancing syrian army. none of them wants to give their names. >> look at this -- we had just got everything set up. but then the floods came and destroyed everything. we lost it all. we were promised a stove and a tent, but so far, no aid has come. >> initially, the united nations was providing aid to the unofficial camp, but no supplies have arrived for two weeks. more than 150 syrians are forced to live here. they need everything -- clothes and shoes for the children, food, mattresses, blankets. most of them had to buy their tents themselves, and even have to pay rent to pitch the tents. apart from one tank of drinking water, there is no sanitation. >> we eat bread and drink tea. sometimes, we buy flour and egg bread. we do not have anything anymore. sometimes we go hungry. sometimes not. we lost my daughter's pants in the flood. she needs new pants, but where am i supposed to get them? >> sometime
has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scandals damaging the ssport andy of e around a world-class -- sport around the world. >> australia has a reputation not just being good at sports but for having clean sports. bad reputation right now seems to be in trouble. this report outlines wide scale doping across our whole range of exports. this is not ju
ending of the story we have been following of a new york city woman who went missing in turkey. her body was found over the weekend. authorities just wrapped up an autopsy. police are scouring the area near the ancient city walls where her body was discovered late saturday. family and friends are mourning the loss. >> she is a doll. she works at chiropractor's where i used to go. she is happy. she is a wonderful person. a wonderful mother. i can't imagine how her husband feels right now. gregg: she vanished while vacationing alone. police say she suffered a fatal blow to the head. martha: president obama insisting new revenues will be needed in the future. but he says the tax hikes may not be necessary. here is a piece of the interview he did yesterday. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. if you combine those things together we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can invest in education and research and development that will help us grow. martha: what do you think about that at home and what does kar
rounds hit the army's central command building. damascus the capital was the last city to mostly hold the vicious war at bay. the rebellion began nearly two years ago, a popular uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of the assad family. neighborhoods have turned to rubble. 70,000 people are dead and refugees are pouring over the borders. some of the leaders of the opposition groups fighting in syria are not in syria tonight. they're in cairo for talks, and that's where we find our correspondent clarissa ward tonight. clarissa, what are they saying about the bombing and what is the point of the talks there? >> reporter: well scott, unsurprisingly the opposition has released a statement condemning today's bombing and saying that the assad regime was to blame for this attack. of course, the assad government saying it was, in fact extremist elements within the opposition who were responsible. but the meetings that are going on here in cairo among the syrian opposition are essentially to determine the conditions for possible talks between the syrian opposition and the assad regime. tho
york city, ed koch. he will be warmly remembered. president bill clinton will be speaking there at the funeral today. the mayor who famously asked everybody, how am i doing all across the city. he was really beloved by a bipartisan gathering of new yorkers i would say and today he will be remembered at temple emanuel at new york city. that will be quite a service i would imagine there. >> there are so many ed koch stories to go around. the "new york post" the other day answered his famous line with a front page that said, you did great. he was a beloved mayor of new york city. martha: yeah, indeed he was and he is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from i
hometown. chicago. and address the growing gun violence gripping that city. trace gallagher has that part of our story. is he live in los angeles. hey, trace. >> and shannon if you look at the numbers in chicago you can see why the red alert is flashing in that city. look at this. last year there were 506 murders in the city of chicago. that's a 16% increase, a significant increase. take a rook just this year 42 homicides already on the exact same pace as last year. there have been seven murders in chicago in just the past five days. the mayor there rahm immanuel is now flooding the streets with police, taking cops who normally do administrative work and putting them in patrol cars. now, what really brought this to a head is the murder last week of 15-year-old pendleton, an honors student. she performed at events surrounding the inauguration. gunned down in a park near her school. police believe it was a case of mistaken identity. the reverend jesse jackson led a march this weekend to the park where she was shot and killed. jackson is now calling on president obama to step in and help his
is the chief meteorologist at our kansas city station, kctv. >> i'll tell you what, scott the worst of it is over with. this morning, we had widespread thunder snow from kansas to missouri. snowfall rate of two to three inches per hour brought this area to its knees with our motorists. we had stranded city buses. bridges were closed for a while. now, what we're anticipating is another round for this evening perhaps another two to four inches of snowfall, some freezing drizzle right now, and wind chills in the single digits. storm total for us is about eight to 12, 14 inches of snowfall for kansas city. >> pelley: chris suchan of our station kctv. chris, thanks very much. chris mentioned thunder snow. we wondered about that. it turns out that it happens when warm, moist air collides with cold air. it's a clash of energy that creates thunder and lightning. it happens all the time in rain storms, but only rarely during a snowstorm. the labor department told us today that another 362,000 americans have joined the line for unemployment benefits, but there is good news. the number of peop
of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build in better safeguards. at the same time, the board said investigators are still weeks away from determining what caused a battery fire on a japan airlines dreamliner in boston. in the meantime, all 50 of the planes in service, remain grounded. budget battle cries echoed up and down pennsylvania avenue in
event south of new york city. we have the rain-snow line. so that might cut back a little bit of the snow totals here in new york but we're still expecting close to a foot or more in new york city. north and west of the city that's where we're getting the snowe. ongoing snow for 12 to even 18 hours with relentless wind. this is a very, very powerful storm overnight tonight. so throughout the day today, things will start to deteriorate. the worst conditions overnight tonight, into tomorrow. we'll see power outages along the east coast most certainly with winds, 30, 40, 50 miles an hour. in some cases hurricane-force winds. we have a hurricane-force bind advisories all along the coast. snow pounds new england. some areas around boston, alisyn, over three feet. which would be historic for them. alisyn: i'm putting on my parka right now. >> the good side it is happening this weekend, all the kids are going. they're excited. alisyn: schools are closing in connecticut. >> we want people to be safe. alisyn: absolutely. thanks for the update. we'll check back in? >> okay. rick: well f
cities or places that are more neutral to it. it is certainly hard to prejudge the outcome of these talks. the foreign minister at a security conference in munich over the weekend was making positive noises about what could be achieved in the new obama administration, the second term you about it is ultimately the supreme leader who calls the shots. certainly the fact that iran told the u.n. nuclear watchdog last week it was going to be deploying a significant number of second generation centrifuges that can spin uranium three times as fast as ones currently used is not a sign of stepping back, jenna. it is certainly a sign of moving quickly along. there are some experts who think that actually more rigorous, intensive, sustained negotiations at this point will be more useful than sanctions. then there are different opinions at this point about this point of no return. some say it his iran has enough fissile materiel it could make a nuclear warhead. and that would be this summer by many estimates. others are saying that red line point is when iran can do that but do it in a way that is un
back marcus allen and his take on concussions and kids in the sport and the clash in the crescent city. president obama shifting focus back to the economy after encouraging economic news friday. >> home prices are starting to climb again and car sales at a five-year high. manufacturing is roaring back. the business created 2.2 million jobs last year and our economy created more jobs than econom t economists originally thought. >> jones industrial average closed about 14,000 on friday, the highest since 2007. the los angeles mayor has put an end to speculation that he will be joining the obama cabinet. there is talk he might be transportation secretary. he said he will finish out his term as mayor. in massachusetts, former senator scott brown said he will not be running for the senate seat vacated by john kerry, but there is speculation that brown could have his eye on the governor's seat when patrick steps down in 2014. we will take you to boston to big deeper into that story later in the show. a whole lot to get to first. vice president biden is in germany and talking international s
of president assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the chaos engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one time, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though no one really knows. a u.n. commission called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's government, which has sought to crush the rebellion, and the rebels, who are seen as warlords, gangsters, and religious fanatics who regularly post videos of beheadings and other atrocities on youtube. damascus is quiet. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down as the terrible war that's tearing their country apart has arrived here. in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. syria's many minorities live in terror of jihadist takeover of their country. before we came here, we visited christian refugees from syria who fled to beirut. they said they were forced out of their villages by muslim fundamentalists, ethnically cleansed. they s
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during six months of intense urban warfare. this weekend, the city will commemorate the event. we have been talking to some of the survivors. >> 70 years since the end of one of the world's bloodiest battles. the memorial remains one of the most symbolic sites in russia. here come close to a million soldiers died in just six months of ruthless combat. a breath-taking german advance into russia had been blocked at stalingrad. hundreds of thousands of men died in a brutal urban warfare as the red army refused to yield. then, once the russian winter set in, fresh soviet forces surrounded the entire army, killing or capturing every man. the german commander was forced into a humiliating situation. this man witnessed the surrender, but the images that etched most strongly on his memory are the images of death and a burning river. >> everything was on fire. the bank of the river was covered mixed with human heads, arms, legs. there are the remains of people who were being taken across when they were bombed. >> the scale of the loss of life is almost beyond imagination and it all happened in
joining gangs. now this report from mexico city. >> the new plan announced by the president is a departure from the previous government strategy. by saying they need to spend more money on social development programs, they are saying the military strategy of the former president did not work. calderon had a 50,000 soldiers and federal police waging war against drug gangs and organized crime groups. there are still many checkpoints and the military still involved. but the president is saying we're not calling to get out of this mess unless we really developed out youth. there are 7 million mexicans under age of 39 who are not employed and they are easy targets for gangs looking for cheap wolabor. -- under the age of 30. the says we need to develop these young people, give them opportunities, and see what they can do with their lives other and worked for criminals. we're not hearing many specifics on how the government will spend the money other than the fact they will try to spend in 250 of the most violent towns across the country. >> hugo chavez is having extremely complex and stuff cance
of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma, or can not empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz can cause blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness and decreased sweating. do not drive, operate machinery or do unsafe tasks until you know how toviaz affects you. the most common side effects are dry mouth and constipation. talk to your doctor about toviaz. >>> some disturbing news today coming from the u.n.'s nuclear watch dogs agency, the iaea which reports officially that ira
use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> what sdt future hold for the former mr. pope? a second career seems out of the question. he can't be a wall mart greeter. that's not going to -- gatorade is in aisle eight. >> ann thompson is back with me. they had the wrong part of that there. ann, i was trying to show the part that included you. we got that messed up. sorry. i just want to see you reacting because you were on john stewart last night. >> that's hysterical. >> yes, indeed. what is next for the pope? tell me about the conclave. they're going to meet on monday and apparently then decide when the conclave will begin? >> yeah. i think what you will see over the weekend -- this is sort of a getting to
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
been, we have a devastating level of youth unemployment in cities like yours. let's focus on that because we love and care for people. we do what is good and political but may not be honest economics. host: current federal minimum wage is $7.25. bob in chesapeake, virginia, independent line. caller: representative, the minimum-wage is used as a political football. i think would be a good thing if we would set the minimum wage on all of the jobs in the country as a national need and a global competitive need instead of letting the minimum wage be brought up every so often as a political football. they need to set the minimum wage on all the jobs. then they can eliminate the union hassles and we can be more globally competitive. guest: you are correct it is used as a political football to get you some wonderful movement on your political base. if we were to think like an economist, you would not have a minimum wage. you would allow the market to generate those wages. if you're going to move to a minimum wage, are you going to have the training wage and for those folks who ar
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: tom donilon is here, he is the president's national security advisor. part of his job is to prepare and deliver the presidential daily brief on national security. joe biden has called him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are sch
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
threat towards seoul, north korean, artillery pieces and rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul in a matter of minutes or a few hours, if the north koreans unleash this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence. to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very, very cognizant about this. another related issue in this connection though is that once north korea mounts nuclear warheads on its missiles, how is, how is that going to affect the retaliation policy? that was established between the united states and south korea in 2010, following the shelling of the young pong island in november of 2010. policy that in the future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily, if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. would support that kind of retaliation. what is going to happen to the u.s. and the rok attitude towards the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear war ahead on its missiles and can threaten to rain nuclear missiles down on south korea, if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)